“The North West Passage” Being The Record Of A Voyage Of The Ship “Gjöa” 1903-1907…With A Supplement By First Lieutenant Hansen Vice-Commander Of The Expedition by Roald Amundsen

Regular price $1,587.55

Shipping calculated at checkout.

AMUNDSEN, Roald [Engelbregt Gravning] [1872-1928]. “The North West Passage” Being The Record Of A Voyage Of The Ship “Gjöa” 1903-1907…With A Supplement By First Lieutenant Hansen Vice-Commander Of The Expedition. 

2 Volumes. 8vo. pp. xiii, 335, [1]; ix, 397, [1]. with half-titles. 2 photogravure frontis., 3 maps (2 folding in colour in rear pockets), & numerous text illus. (many full-page). A near nice tight copy in original gilt-stamped cloth, t.e.g. (occasional light foxing, a few very short tears at head of spines). London: Archibald Constable And Company Limited, 1908.        

 

     First Edition of the English Translation. Narrative of the Norwegian arctic expedition led by Amundsen in 1903-06, which was the first to successfully navigate the northwest passage. Part of his success can be attributed to his use of a small shallow-bottomed ship that could travel close to the coastline. Amundsen was also tasked with conducting investigations of magnetic conditions in the region of the North Magnetic Pole. The work “contains descriptions of the voyage to the Canadian Arctic, the wintering at Gjöa Haven on King William Island, 1903-04 and 1904-05, the magnetic work, the Eskimos, boat and sledge trips, the passage through the straits, to King Point (Yukon Territory), the wintering (1905-06) there, the Eskimos of the Mackenzie delta region, a visit to Herschel Island, the voyage to Nome, Alaska…”. (Arctic Bib.) Appended, pp. 296-364, is an account by Godfred Hansen, of three cartographic trips, 1904-05, in particular that along the east coast of Victoria Island (King Haakon VII Coast). During his expedition Amundsen learned invaluable arctic skills from the local Inuit including how to use sled dogs for transportation of goods and to wear animal skins instead of heavy, woolen parkas, which could not keep out the cold when wet.

     Arctic Bib. 402. Ricks p. 22. Smith 196. Wickersham 6672.